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Ken Magill

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First: Mobile Outpaces Desktop on Thanksgiving, says IBM

12/2/14
 
For the first time, online traffic from mobile devices outpaced traditional PCs on Thanksgiving Day, IBM reported earlier today. 
 
Thanksgiving Day reached a new mobile tipping point with browsing on smartphones and tablets accounting for 52.1 percent of all online traffic, according to IBM. Overall Thanksgiving online sales were up 14.3 percent compared to 2013, IBM reported.  
 
Overall Black Friday online sales were up 9.5 percent year-over-year with mobile devices accounting for one-in-four of all online purchases, according to IBM. New York City also retained its title as the top U.S. city for Black Friday online shopping, the report said.
 
“Mobile has become the new Thanksgiving tradition as consumers find the best deals with their fingers as well as their feet," said Jay Henderson, Director, IBM Smarter Commerce, in a statement. “We saw retailers harness the power of data to engage shoppers, identifying the unique preferences of their customers while quickly capitalizing on online, mobile or in-store trends as they emerged.”
 
In other findings, according to IBM:
 
Black Friday mobile traffic reached 49.6 percent of all online traffic, an increase of 25 percent over last year. Black Friday mobile sales accounted for 27.9 percent of total online sales, up 28.2 percent over 2013.
 
Smartphones drove 34.7 percent of all Black Friday online traffic, more than double that of tablets, which accounted for 14.6 percent of all traffic. Yet, tablets accounted for 16 percent of online sales compared to 11.8 percent for smartphones, a difference of 35.5 percent. Tablet users also averaged $126.50 per order compared to $107.55 for smartphone users, a difference of 17.6 percent.
 
Thanksgiving Day online sales increased 14.3 percent over 2013, with Black Friday up 9.5 percent year-over-year.
 
Average order value on Thanksgiving was $125.25, down 1.8 percent over 2013; Black Friday was $129.37, down 4.4 percent. 
 
Black Friday online sales were 63.5 percent higher than Thanksgiving Day, a decrease from 2013 when it was 70 percent higher as Thanksgiving online sales continue to eat into Black Friday shopping.
 
iOS users averaged $121.86 per order compared to $98.07 for Android users, a difference 24.3 percent.
 
iOS traffic accounted for 34.2 percent of total online traffic, more than double that of Android, which drove 15 percent of all online traffic.
 
iOS sales accounted for 21.9 percent of total online sales, nearly quadruple that of Android, which drove 5.8 percent of all online sales. 
 
The Desktop is Not Dead: When consumers did choose to use their PC or desktop, they spent more with an average order value of $135.33 compared to $116.02 for mobile shoppers, a difference of 16.6 percent.
 
Social Influence – Facebook vs. Pinterest: Facebook referrals drove an average of $109.94 per order compared to $100.24 for Pinterest, a difference of nearly 10 percent.  Facebook referrals converted online sales at more than twice the rate of Pinterest.  
 
Less Frequent, More Targeted Email Promos: Retailers sent an average of 5.3 emails on Black Friday 2014, decreasing more than 11 percent over the same period in 2013, as retail marketers continue to send more targeted -- and less frequent -- messages to shoppers. 
 
Open and click-through rates were 12.9 percent and 2.4 percent, on Black Friday and Thanksgiving Day, compared to 15.4 percent and 2.8 percent respectively, last year.
 
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Terms: Feel free to be as big a jerk as you want, but don't attack anyone other than me personally. And don't criticize people or companies other than me anonymously. Got something crappy to say? Say it under your real name. Anonymous potshots and personal attacks aimed at me, however, are fine.

Posted by: Ken Magill
Date: 2014-12-03 13:09:06
Subject: Tablet V. Desktop

Hey Dela, Richard: I can't argue with any of the points you raise. The only thing I can tell you is you'll know when tablets are truly mainstream when you see me with one:)
Posted by: Richard H. Levey
Date: 2014-12-02 22:45:20
Subject: But Tablets Aren't Quite Laptops/Desktops, Either...

Dela Quist raises an interesting point regarding how tablets users should be classified. I suspect most marketers are interested in classifying device owners to better determine their buying habits. If that's the case, lumping 'em in with laptop/desktop users offers a fuzzy picture as well. There are several reasons why. The first is that tablet penetration hasn't yet equaled smartphone use rates. Tablets are the third interactive screen, after laptop/desktops and smartphones. As of early this year, smartphone penetration stood at 74 percent, compared with tablet ownership rates of 55 percent, according to eMarketer. What this indicates is that tablets are more of an optional purchase, one most likely made by more-affluent consumers. It makes sense, therefore, that tablet-owning consumers would have more to spend. Additionally, consumers appear to be approaching promotions made via tablets and smartphones differently. In mid-November, eMarketer released figures stating that 53 percent of tablet users were likely to use a digital coupon when making a purchase via their tablets, compared with 40 percent of consumers making purchases via their smartphones. Since coupons are designed to stimulate sales -- especially incremental sales -- this fact provides possibilities into why tablet sales values are higher than smartphones. There is another possibility, of course: Smartphones are often used for low-price purchases such as coffee. Tablets may not be used for these types of purchases as frequently, and I have yet to see anyone try to pay for a venti latte with a desktop machine. If these low-cost purchases weren't factored out of the results, smartphone average purchase values would be lower. Anyone want to take a guess as to where the truth lies?
Posted by: Dela Quist
Date: 2014-12-02 19:33:14
Subject: Wish experts would top classifying tablets with mobiles!!!

Hi Ken As far as I can see tablet surfing and purchasing is closer to laptop/desktop behavior than mobile and should be reported under that category. I think IBM's own data proves this as you can see from this quote from your article "Smartphones drove 34.7 percent of all Black Friday online traffic, more than double that of tablets, which accounted for 14.6 percent of all traffic. Yet, tablets accounted for 16 percent of online sales compared to 11.8 percent for smartphones, a difference of 35.5 percent. Tablet users also averaged $126.50 per order compared to $107.55 for smartphone users, a difference of 17.6 percent." QED So if you took tablet away from mobile and gave it to laptop/desktop........

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